Land Exit Survey

Land Exit Survey: Tokyo Disneyland’s World Bazaar

We’re hopping back on the Land Exit Survey train, this time across the Pacific into Tokyo Disneyland’s World Bazaar. While the park plays like a greatest hits of Magic Kingdom and Disneyland, the entrance is different even in name as World Bazaar is the park’s Main Street. Theme parks are made up of sub-sections, generally called lands which is what World Bazaar is. Since you’re reading a theme parks blog, I’m guessing you probably know that. Many of these lands are spectacular, some are far from it. In this series, we cover individual lands one post at a time and answer some questions about them.

While we won’t be diving incredibly deep into these lands, I’ll provide the basic information about the area and we’ll add in some of our opinions. We’ll also use these posts to talk about theme both throughout the land and within the park. All of the posts will use the same questions. Let us know in the comments if there are questions that we should add!

So far in this series we’ve covered:

Tokyo Disneyland is the last of the park’s I’ve been to that isn’t on the list. Since Michaela hasn’t been (unfortunately!), I’ll be answering the questions on my own on this one. It’s lonely out here but the thought of waffles and a beautiful castle will pull me through.

What is your short(ish) review of Tokyo Disneyland’s World Bazaar?

Main Street doesn’t mean much to Japanese locals, so taking a broader worldly approach makes sense for the park entrance. That said, much of it feels the same as the usual Main Street with shops and parades cycling through. There are a few bizarre (pun intended) moments including a roof, lack of train station and ‘Center Street’ but the park entrance is beautiful in all of its Victorian-themed glory.

TDL arcade 35th anniversary centerpiece

What’s in the land?

Beware of the overwhelming number of shops and restaurants!

  • Omnibus – The double decker bus that travels up and down the street.
  • Penny Arcade – An arcade with old-fashioned pinball machines and 3-D movie viewers.
  • Dreaming UpThis spectacular daytime parade travels near World Bazaar. It’s full of character and raises the stakes. Try to see it near the castle.
  • Tokyo Disneyland Electrical Parade DreamlightsThe nighttime parade levels up on the daytime offering. It is the best parade I’ve ever seen.
  • Center Street Coffeehouse – This table service restaurant resembles an American diner but offers Japanese curry, which is delicious.
  • Eastside Cafe – A table service restaurant on the way to Adventureland that offers pasta.
  • Great American Waffle Company – You guessed it, there’s waffles at this counter service spot! Large Mickey ones at that.
  • Ice Cream Cones – Points here for a literal name. This counter-service location offers ice cream.
  • Refreshment Corner – Hot dogs, chicken nuggets and salad are offered at this quick service location.
  • Restaurant Hokusai – Home to traditional Japanese dishes like udon, tempura and pork cutlets, Restaurant Hokusai is a table service spot.
  • Sweetheart Cafe – A quick service spot selling pastries, desserts, snacks and coffee.
  • Club 33 – Similar to Disneyland, Club 33 is a members only restaurant. TDL’s has a second story view facing the castle at the end of World Bazaar.
  • Camera Center – Home of photopass, camera accessories and other items.
  • Grand Emporium – The largest selection of merchandise in the park.
  • Silhouette Studio – They will draw your silhouette here, as well as offer other fine art pieces.
  • Town Center Fashions – Tokyo Disneyland’s largest apparel shop.
  • Disney & Co. – Home to all of the plushes and accessories.
  • Toy Station – The park’s toy store.
  • House of Greetings – The place to go to get stationary, books, DVD’s and more.
  • Harrington’s Jewelry & Watches – Home of jewelry, watches and bags.
  • Pastry Palace – Packaged cookies, cakes and other tasty treats.
  • The Home Store – Tableware and other home goods.
  • Magic Shop – Like the original Main Street, World Bazaar features a Magic Shop to see, and do your own, magic tricks.
  • World Bazaar Confectionary – Tokyo Disneyland’s candy shop!
Wall Castle flowers TDL

What is World Bazaar’s backstory and theme?

I wouldn’t say that World Bazaar has much of a backstory, as it’s a worldly version of Disneyland and Magic Kingdom’s Main Street. While Americana is loved in Japan as seen through some of the other aspects of the theme park, small town America doesn’t have significance among their culture. That said, the shops lining the main (umm) street all have a similar feeling. If anything World Bazaar has more of a grandiose feeling, similar to Magic Kingdom.

Due to different weather patterns than Anaheim and Orlando, Tokyo Disneyland does sport a beautiful glass and iron Victorian-style canopy. There’s also a large street that cuts through World Bazaar called Center Street that is essentially a shortcut to Tomorrowland or Adventureland. All of the shops and restaurants are similar to the 20th century theme that we see on the classic Main Streets. Along with the roof, the street simply feels bigger and there are no sidewalks. It’s an odd yet familiar feeling all at once.

35th Icon and castle TDL

What is your favorite part of the land? What’s the most memorable aspect of it?

If we count the parades inside of the land (they do go through the majority of the park) then I’m not sure how those can be beat. They are larger than life and practically perfect. Inside of the land proper, I’m really drawn to the roof. The way the glass canopy frames the castle is something to behold and it just adds a level of elegance to the area. I think that’s the most memorable aspect of the land, especially coming from the states. Shoutout to the number of places to eat in the area, as well!

Genie Castle Dreamlight TDL

Are there parts of World Bazaar you don’t like?

The roof can be a double edged sword because it will protect you from the weather but it will also make the area jam packed at times. Main Street at Disneyland and Magic Kingdom can get crowded and it’s not pleasant, but World Bazaar can take that to a new level. Thankfully the street is big and tries to accommodate as many people as possibly but I don’t like how crowded it can get.

How does the land coincide and transition with the rest of the park? Does World Bazaar make the park better or worse?

Like Magic Kingdom, Tokyo Disneyland has a perfect beginning. On the right side is futuristic design, on the left is South Pacific themed. The clean lines and elegance of the Victorian-architecture make for a beautiful jumping off point. There’s a ‘wow’ factor when entering, no doubt. World Bazaar undoubtedly makes the park better, adding a level of familiarity mixed with ‘well, that’s a little strange’. It’s a smart opening chapter to the park.

TDL entrance night

Where would you rank the land in relation to the others in the park?

It’s hard to do these with park entrances simply because of the lack of attractions. I’ll persevere but just know that the land does suffer because there aren’t really any rides in it. With incredible attractions in almost every land, World Bazaar ranks just slightly above Toontown (sorry to Roger Rabbit and the Pizza Spring Rolls) but below Westernland, Critter Country, Tomorrowland, Adventureland and Fantasyland. So 6th place out of 7. But they’re all winners in my book!

Partners and castle TDL

What do you think of Tokyo Disneyland’s World Bazaar? Do you like our Land Exit Surveys? Would you add anything? Let us know, along with any questions you might have, in the comments below. Interested in a trip to Tokyo Disney Resort? Check out our Planning Guide to help you along the way! If you enjoy what you are reading here on Wandering in Disney please share this post with your friends, as well as like our social media pages. You can also subscribe to the blog via WordPress or email. All of those links are on the right side of this page. Thank you for reading, we really appreciate it!

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